What Really Happened at Indian Boarding Schools?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-ngiri-126980a

The discovery of mass graves at Indian boarding schools showed how little we understand about these institutions, so I invited a leading expert on Native American education to help me understand.

In this episode, Dr. John Gram mentions the following books:

-Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, by David Wallace Adams

-Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940, by Brenda J. Child

-They Called It Prairie Light: The Story of Chilocco Indian School, by K. Tsianina Lomawaima

 

And you can find Dr. John Gram’s very useful history website here.

As always, the wonderful music is the song ‘Ezekial,’ and it comes to us courtesy of Christine Hand. Check it out.

Did Captain Cook Have a God Complex?

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-bpdnf-11a6e4d

On Valentine’s Day in 1779, Captain Cook’s violent ways finally caught up to him. But it might have been avoided if he’d thought just a little bit less of himself.

 

This episode is indebted to the work of Dr. Shino Konishi of The University of Western Australia because of her excellent article on Cook’s punishments, which you can read here:

https://theconversation.com/captain-cook-wanted-to-introduce-british-justice-to-indigenous-people-instead-he-became-increasingly-cruel-and-violent-127025

 

Music: “Ezekiel” by Christine Hand.

How to Kill a Vampire (In the Middle Ages)

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-58y6z-1110c4f

Today we’ll look at a few more medieval vampires (including the Dog Priest of Melrose Monastery and the Hellhound of Castle Anantis) and learn the best way to kill them (should you find yourself traveling through time need to defend yourself against monsters), and then a word about why I think these monster stories are more than just campy folklore.

Marshal Law, Now Available as an Audio Book!

Wherever you listen to audio books, you can now find Marshal Law, the first book in my steampunk/fantasy series.

It’s exciting to be an indie author these days. With a few mouse clicks my hard work finds its way to just about every virtual storefront. Even library catalogs have it. People around the world have listened to my books at their local library, an image that always makes me smile. That sort of thing wasn’t possible for every author in the old days.

Interested? You can get this audio book in a lot of places, but here’s just a few:

Find out more about Marshal Law here. And if you want to get deals on future releases, sign up for the newsletter. It comes with a free story, so you can’t lose.

Quarantine Books for the Fantasy Reader

Stuck inside? Of course you are. Not to worry—I’ve found some books that will keep you company. Some new, and some not so new.

X Marks the Spot: An Anthology of Treasure and Theft edited by Lisa Mangum

“Magic pirate stories.” There’s no part of that sentence I don’t like. Bonus: the opening story is by Kristen Bickerstaff, who wrote a really fun piece in The Lost Legends. This one released just a few days ago, and it’s just in time, because I’m pretty sure mermaids and swashbuckling and treasure maps is exactly the fun you need in your life right now.

When Fire Loves Water – Part 1: The Siren by J. Suzanne Frank

Here’s another one hot off the press. If the last book about pirates and magic strikes your fancy, then you’ll want to dive into this YA tale about teenagers and mermaids. While When Fire Loves Water features teenagers caught up in a fantasy world, the strange creatures, interesting magic, and vast world-building make it like nothing you’ve ever read before. Plus, it has a really cool map. (You’re not a fantasy reader if you don’t drool over cool maps.) If you love YA and want something new, go start this series today.

Assassin’s Apprentice – The Illustrated Edition by Robin Hobb

I know. It’s a classic. Why bother posting about a classic? Because the illustrated edition is amazing. So far, only the first book in the series has been released in this format, but the rest are on the way and I’m obsessed with the brilliant paintings and gorgeous layout. This is how books are supposed to look.

The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius

A philosophy textbook? Ok. I realize this one is a strange choice, but bear with me. In the sixth century, poor Boethius, a very good man, was imprisoned wrongfully. Some kind of political stunt. Forever separated from his life and his family, he turned to philosophy and discovered great comfort even in his cell.

Why is it on my quarantine readings list? Because if you’re trapped at home and need a pick-me-up, you’ll be surprised what philosophy has to offer. And you’ll be pleasantly surprised to learn The Consolation of Philosophy is blissfully short and a breeze to read. And free.

Dragon’s Lure – Legends of a New Age edited by Danielle Ackley-McPhail, Jennifer Ross, and Jeffrey Lyman

Sarah Ban Breathnach said, “It simply isn’t an adventure worth telling if there aren’t any dragons.” (No, it wasn’t Tolkien.) If that’s the case, here’s a book full of stories that are definitely worth telling.

This one’s been around for a while, but anthologies sometimes fly under the radar. I just received a signed copy from David Coe (Thanks!) and have enjoyed every word of this collection so far. It’s amusing, diverting, and it’s about dragons—exactly the distraction I was looking for.

(I also need your book recommendations if I’m going to get through this, so bring ’em on.)